No One Writes to the Colonel 1999

Every Friday, the Colonel puts on his only suit and goes to the dock to await a letter announcing the arrival of his pension. But the townsfolk all know that this pension will never come. His wife also knows it, and even he knows it. But he is still waiting, living with the pain of the death of his son.

Colonel March of Scotland Yard 1956

Colonel March of The Department of Queer Complaints investigates unusual cases, locked-room murders, and mysteries concerning the supernatural.

Colonel Humphrey Flack 1953

Colonel Humphrey Flack is an American sitcom which ran Wednesdays at 9pm ET from October 7, 1953 to July 2, 1954 on the DuMont Television Network, then revived from 1958 to 1959 for first-run syndication. The series also aired under the titles The Fabulous Fraud, The Adventures of Colonel Flack, and The Imposter.

Colonel Bleep

Colonel Bleep was the first color cartoon ever made for television. It was created by Robert D. Buchanan, and was filmed by Soundac of Miami. The show was originally syndicated in 1957 as a segment on Uncle Bill's TV Club. 104 episodes, of varying length of between three and six minutes each, were produced. Of these episodes, slightly fewer than half are known to survive today. The show took place on the fictitious Zero Zero Island, where the Equator meets the Greenwich Meridian. There, Colonel Bleep, a futuristic extraterrestrial lifeform from the planet Futura, protected Earth with the help of his two deputies. Representing the present day was Squeek, and representing the past was Scratch, a caveman of great physical strength who was awakened from a sleep of several thousand years by the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the same event that triggered Colonel Bleep's travels to earth. Colonel Bleep, like all of his fellow Futurans, could manipulate "futomic energy" in a variety of ways; for instance, to propel himself through space, or as an offensive weapon. The amount of futomic energy Colonel Bleep could absorb at any given time was finite, and in several episodes he runs out of energy and becomes vulnerable.

Calvin and the Colonel 1961

Calvin and the Colonel is an animated cartoon television series in 1961 about Colonel Montgomery J. Klaxon, a shrewd fox and Calvin T. Burnside, a dumb bear. Their lawyer was Oliver Wendell Clutch, who was a weasel. The colonel lived with his wife Maggie Belle and her sister Sue, who did not trust the colonel at all. Colonel Klaxon was in the real estate business, but always tried get-rich-quick schemes with Calvin's unwitting help. The series was an animated remake of Amos 'n' Andy [or, more or less, "Andy and The Kingfish"] and featured the voices of Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll from the radio series. Using animals avoided the touchy racial issues which had led to the downfall of Amos 'n' Andy. Because of low ratings, the show was cancelled after two months, but returned two months later to complete the first season contract. For a year afterward reruns were seen on Saturday mornings, and eventually syndicated through the 1960s. It was also adapted as a comic book by Dell Comics, and as such the first of two issues was the final installment in the company's extremely prolific Four Color anthology series.

McKeever and the Colonel 1962

McKeever and the Colonel is an American situation comedy that was broadcast on NBC television in the United States from 1962-1963. Its setting was a Westfield military academy. Dick Powell's Four Star Television produced the series. Gary McKeever was the name of a student who was the lead of the series, whilst the Colonel in the title referred to the school commandant who was constantly at loggerheads with McKeever. Jackie Coogan played Sgt. Barnes, a soldier at the school who was sympathetic to McKeever. The program also starred character actor John McGiver. The guest stars included Walter Coy, formerly the host of the NBC anthology series Frontier.